5 Tips to Make Your Next Meal Healthier
by Hollis Lotharius, Barry’s Bootcamp trainer, San Diego

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Sit, breathe and then chew!

Prior to picking up your fork, check in with your hunger, sit down and relax. Take a few deep breaths to lower your heart rate and prepare to enjoy the food you are about to consume. Make an effort to take at least a full 15 – 20 minutes to complete your meal, even if it is just a snack. Make sure to stop eating when you feel about 80% full, this will allow for your body to register that you have eaten enough and to avoid overeating.
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Is there protein dense food on your plate?

Are you about to consume at least 1 serving of protein dense food? Women should strive to eat 1 palm-sized portion (about 3 ounces) of protein while men should eat about 2 palm-sized portions (about 6 ounces) of lean protein with every meal.
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Are there vegetables on your plate?

Along with your protein, you should be about to dig into a large portion of vegetables; prepared any way you like. One serving is about 1 fist-sized portion. It is best to eat a few portions per meal; most of your plate should be covered with vegetables. Make a point to create a rainbow on your plate; more color equals a higher variety of nutrients.

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Are there carbohydrates on your plate? 

Carbohydrates compose an important part of each meal. However, if you are focusing on losing fat, but haven’t just worked out, eat less pasta, bread, rice, and other starchy carbohydrates. Choose to eat a double serving of vegetables instead. If you have just worked out (within the last 3 hours), feel free to add a serving of starchy carbohydrates to your plate. Focus on consuming whole grains – grains that have experienced the least amount of processing like brown rice, whole wheat pasta, or rolled oats.

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Where does the fat come from?  

It is important to consume some fats (about 25-35% of your total daily calories) from various food sources. Make it a priority to ingest fat from whole food sources like eggs, meats, fish, olives, nuts and seeds throughout the day.

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Hollis Lotharius is currently an instructor at Barry’s Bootcamp in San Diego, California. Her entire career has been focused on helping others in health, exercise and nutrition. Hollis holds a Bachelor of Science in Nutrition from California Polytechnic Institute, San Luis Obispo. While in college, she competed on Cal Poly’s triathlon club team all four years of attendance and was elected Team President both her junior and senior years. In addition to teaching at Barry’s, Hollis has previously taught Body Pump and indoor cycling classes. Hollis is an I.S.S.A. certified fitness trainer. Prior to joining Barry’s, she dedicated three years, two as Store Manager, to the success of the lululemon athletica store in La Jolla, California.

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Hollis

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